Thursday, June 25, 2009

Salt of the Earth

Frazar Online Film Collection: Salt of the Earth



Source: Google Video

Herbert Biberman's 1954 film, Salt of the Earth, has the distinction of being the only film to be blacklisted in the United States. From the Wikipedia article:


Salt of the Earth (1954) is an American drama film written by Michael Wilson, directed by Herbert J. Biberman (husband of Academy Award-winning actress Gale Sondergaard), and produced by Paul Jarrico. All had been blacklisted by the Hollywood establishment due to their involvement in socialist politics.[1]
The movie became a historical phenomenon and has a cult following due to how the United States establishment (politicians, journalists, studio executives, and other trade unions) dealt with the film. Salt of the Earth is one of the first pictures to advance the feminist social and political point of view.
The film centers around a long and difficult strike led by Mexican-American and Anglo miners against the Empire Zinc Company. The film shows how the miners, the company, and the police, react during the strike. In neorealist style the producers and director used actual miners and their families as actors in the film.
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Thursday, June 18, 2009

Emma Goldman

Frazar Online Film Collection: Emma Goldman



Source: Google Video

On a cold December morning in 1919, just after midnight, Emma Goldman, her comrade Alexander Berkman, and more than 200 other foreign-born radicals were roused from their Ellis Island dormitory beds to begin their journey out of the United States for good.
Convicted of obstructing the draft during World War I, Goldman's expatriation came 34 years after she had first set foot in America, a young, brilliant, Russian immigrant. For more than three decades, she taunted mainstream America with her outspoken attacks on government, big business and war.
Goldman's passionate espousal of radical causes made her the target of persecution. Her sympathy for Leon Czolgosz, the assassin of President McKinley, brought down upon her the hatred of the authorities and the public at large. Feared as a sponsor of anarchy and revolution, she was vilified in the press as "Red Emma," "Queen of the Anarchists," and "the most dangerous woman in America."
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Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Home

Frazar Online Film Collection: Home













Source: YouTube

French environmentalist and photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand's film Home, which was recently released world-wide in a record 181 countries, chronicles the current state of our impact upon the Earth's environment. Comprised of stunning aerial photography and a moving musical score, the film was made available on YouTube on the same day as it debuted in theatres across the world.

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Monday, June 8, 2009

Introduction to Buddhism

Frazar Online Film Collection: Introduction to Buddhism



Source: YouTube

From Open Culture:
When the Dalai Lama paid a visit to Emory University, he offered an introductory lecture to Tibetan Buddhism. The lecture is not exactly what you’d normally get in the university classroom. The talk is not entirely linear. And he spends some time speaking in English, then speaks in his native tongue (with the help of an interpreter). But, he can talk about Buddhism with the authority that few authors can, and there’s a reason audiences come to see him in droves. Things really get going about 23 minutes in.
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In the Library:
  • Bstan-ʼdzin-rgya-mtsho, and Robert Kiely. 1996. The good heart: a Buddhist perspective on the teachings of Jesus. Boston: Wisdom Publications. [link: WorldCat]
  • Bstan-ʼdzin-rgya-mtsho, and Victor Chan. 2004. The wisdom of forgiveness intimate conversations and journeys. New York: Riverhead Books. [link: WorldCat, NetLibrary]
  • Cherniack, David, Bstan-ʼdzin-rgya-mtsho, and Robert A. F. Thurman. 1997. The Four Noble Truths [DVD]. New York: Mystic Fire Video. [link: WorldCat]
  • Conze, Edward. 1959. Buddhism, its essence and development. New York, N.Y.: Harper & Bros. [link: WorldCat]
  • Goleman, Daniel. 2003. Destructive emotions: how can we overcome them? : a scientific dialogue with the Dalai Lama. New York: Bantam Books. [link: WorldCat]
  • Hamilton, Clarence Herbert. 1952. Buddhism, a religion of infinite compassion; selections from Buddhist literature. The Library of religion, v.1. New York: Liberal Arts Press. [link: WorldCat]

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